The hiring process can be tough to make time for as a busy business owner. Sometimes having some key ways to filter out experienced from inexperienced irrigation technicians makes the process more efficient. In a popular post on LawnSite, member Water Saver asked the question: “What are the top things an irrigation technician should know?” What do you think irrigation technician should be able to explain to you, to prove their competence? There are hundreds or thousands a technician needs to know to be proficient, according to LawnSite member Water Saver. Here are the top answers from other LawnSite members.

1. Understanding the proper and efficient use of each of these three devices: wire tracer, valve locator, fault finder. —NC_Irrigator

2. What a swing pipe is; the proper way to go from PVS to male threads; the proper way to join metal to PVC … explain head layouts and choices to you; demonstrate proper way to make repairs; know the proper way to glue pipe together. —stebs

3. My ex-inventory clerk was a general contractor and his first interview question was to toss a tape measure to the interviewee and ask, “Find me 16 7/8.” Simple and effective. —Srlance31

4. How to glue PVC with blue glue and purple primer without making a mess. —Kawasaki guy

5. Ability to actually talk to people. Not only does a technician need to know their job at hand, you wouldn’t be good if you don’t have actual talking skills. Explain to the customer the situation in a manner they understand while keeping a professional approach. —mitchgo

6. I ask them to pick up a shovel off the ground. If they bend over and pick it up, they’ve never done much irrigation. If they tap the blade with their foot and the handle pops up in their hand, they’re hired. —Phatdaddy

7. In my dreams, I wished for a tech that had a horticultural background, I [found one] and it was helpful as all get out, not only for design and management, but I could go toe-to-toe with the prima donna LAs and “designers.” —Mike Leary

8. Nice question to ask during an interview, especially if you deal with pumps, is head pressure, such as what is a foot of head or how tall does a column of water one inch square need to be for 1 psi? —Srlance31

9. You will need to know how to problem solve and there aren’t always black and white ‘right’ answers. The person I’m looking for is the one who asks follow-up questions when you throw out the generic “What does a reading of 15 ohms indicate?” not just “I don’t know.” —cjohn2000

10. Being proactive is a must! Grab all you need. Quit making five trips to your service vehicle for a repair. —MySprinklerMedic

11. That 12 p.m. doesn’t mean drop everything and go to lunch. —Sprinkus

Read more answers to this question or share your advice on LawnSite.com.