Facebook is the most popular social network across the world with 2 billion users. Knowing that it is fairly user-friendly, it can be easy to create a brand image for your landscape business. And even though it is easy to provide constant updates to your fans and followers, there are a few key things you should avoid for your Facebook business Page.

Here’s what NOT to do on Facebook:

1. Don’t use a personal Facebook profile for your business.

Instead, create a Page. Facebook Pages are intended for organizations, businesses, brands and celebrities. Using personal profiles to represent your business is actually in violation of Facebook’s policies. If Facebook identifies a profile as a business page, they can remove it from the site. Plus, by managing a Facebook Page, you have access to the Ads Manager and analytics.

 2. Avoid sharing content that could be controversial or could alienate your customers.

Politics is very prevalent on social media with the recent election and it can be hard to avoid. If you want to join a specific conversation around controversial or political topics, it is recommended that it is kept to a personal page. Other topics to consider avoiding would be any personal issues, complaints, religion or any explicit content.

Read More: 4 Best Practices to Follow on Facebook

3. Don’t add hashtags to your posts.

In general, hashtags on Facebook don’t operate the way they do on Twitter or Instagram. The hashtag function is different because of Facebook’s algorithms and individual users’ privacy settings.

4. Don’t post personal photos or use images without permission.

Avoid posting personal pictures to your business account; save that for your personal account. Your clients don’t want to see your selfies. However, it can be fun to share photos of employees at company outings or on the job, or highlight an employee of the month. Also, absolutely do not use other people’s or other business’s photos unless you have specific permission from them. If you do have permission from them, be sure to credit the photographer or the owner of the photo.